Installing your Wattics Octopus

This post explains how to supply power to your Wattics Octopus, and outlines the main device configurations and hardware interfaces.

 

The Octopus is a data logger that is built around the following components:

  • Gateway Unit with network, serial and I/O interfaces;
  • (optional) I/O Extension units if more I/Os are required;
  • (optional) GPRS Extension if Internet connectivity is needed.

 

 

This manual should be used to:

  • Familiarise yourself with the Octopus Gateway and I/O Extension units.
  • Install and operate your Octopus Gateway and I/O Extension units
  • Interface the Octopus Gateway and I/O Extension units with metering devices (e.g. Modbus meters, pulse units, PT100 probes, etc).

 

NOTE: Read and understand this document and all related documents before installing, operating, or maintaining your Octopus. Installation and program procedures must be carried out and inspected by qualified personnel. Qualified personnel are those who, based on their training and experience, are capable of identifying risks and avoiding potential hazards when working with this product.

 

1 Octopus Gateway Unit

1.1 Specifications

 

 
 

 

1.2 Installation

 

  • Installation must take place according to the documentation, using suitable equipment and tools.
  • Devices must be installed without voltage applied and by qualified personnel.
  • General safety regulations and nationally applicable accident prevention guidelines must be observed.
  • Electrical installation must be carried out according to the relevant safety guidelines

 

The Octopus Gateway unit requires 24VDC 1A power, supplied through the + and – inputs of the left hand side terminal. The Octopus Gateway unit can be installed in electrical control cabinets or in small distribution were hazard voltages are present. When installing observe the risks and avoid potential hazards.

 


 

The Octopus Gateway unit can be installed on DIN rail in electrical control cabinets or in small distribution boards.

 

 

 

2. Octopus I/O Extension unit

2.1 Specifications

 

 
 

 

2.2 Installation

  • Installation must take place according to the documentation, using suitable equipment and tools.
  • Devices must be installed without voltage applied and by qualified personnel.
  • General safety regulations and nationally applicable accident prevention guidelines must be observed.
  • Electrical installation must be carried out according to the relevant safety guidelines

 

The Octopus IO Extension requires 24VDC 1A power, supplied through the + and – inputs of the left hand side terminal. The Octopus IO Extension units can be installed in electrical control cabinets or in small distribution were hazard voltages are present. When installing observe the risks and avoid potential hazards.

 

Similar to the Octopus Gateway units, the Octopus IO Extension units can be installed on DIN rail in electrical control cabinets or in small distribution boards.

 

3. Connecting I/O Extension Units to a Gateway unit

 

When measurement points are required at various locations, it is possible to deploy one or more Octopus I/O Extension units and connect them to an existing Octopus Gateway unit via CAN BUS system with communication speeds of up to 1000 Kbit/s. The CAN Bus connector pinout is described below.

 

3.1 CAN Bus Connector

 

 
 

3.2 Terminal resistor

When more than one unit are connected to the CAN Bus the terminal resistor must be switched ON on both ends of the CAN Bus to ensure data is not compromised (all the other units should have it OFF).

 

 

3.3 CAN Bus Interface (with one power supply)

The GND lines of the Octopus Data Logger and I/O extension units do not need to be connected if they are on the same CAN Bus.

 
 

3.4 CAN Bus Interface (multiple power supplies in several electrical boards)

 
 

3.5 CAN Bus Baud Rate

The baud rate scales automatically and is not adjustable by the user.

 

 

3.6 CAN Bus Verification

With the power supply turned OFF, the resistance on the CANBus must be 60 Ohms (plus or minus 5 ohms).

 
 

4 RS232 & RS485 (6P6C, known as RJ11, RJ12, RJ14, RJ25)

The 6P6C modular connection provides serial communication over RS232 or RS485 for external devices.

 

  • Over RS485 is possible to use multi-point connections such as MODBUS RTU or DMX512 protocol, for more details please refer to the specific manual.
  • RS232 provides point-to-point connection.

 

IMPORTANT when using the RS485 connector provided by Wattics:

  • RS485 D+ = Yellow wire
  • RS485 D – = Blue wire
  • GND/Shield = Red wire
  •  

     

    Modbus devices typically use A, B and S terminals for RS485 connections:

  • A is generally the differential signal +
  • B is generally the differential signal –
  • S is generally connected to the shield of the twisted pair cables
  •  

    It is important you check first that A, B and S are used as above, some Modbus devices like the Carlo Gavazzi EM21 meters use A for – and B for +.

    Once you have confirmed the A, B and S wiring on the meter you can connect your Wattics RS485 connector as follows:

  • Yellow wire = A
  • Blue wire = B
  • Red wire = S

We recommend that you cut or isolate the other wires as wire number 3 supplies 24V.

 

 

 
For daisy chain or long distance installations, it is very important that wiring is done with twisted cable that provides maximum noise immunity. It is also possible use an unshielded cable, while reducing network speed.

To obtain a transmission line as possible immune to the noise, a good practice is to place resistors at both ends of the line, to keep the line impedance balanced. We recommend that the RS485 cable is terminated at each end with a 120 ohm resistor for daisy chain or long distance installations. Check the value of the Octopus Gateway unit RS485 Bus resistance (120 ohm expected). If the measured value is different from the desired value, turn on the resistor switch to guarantee 120 ohms.

 

5 Ethernet

The Ethernet connection provides a full-duplex 10/100Tx connection to the Octopus Gateway unit. With such connection it is possible to program and control the whole Octopus Gateway unit over the network and to use multi-point connections such as MODBUS TCP.

 

6 GPRS

You must ensure that you use a standard sim card. Other sim card types are not supported.


 

The sim card must be inserted as follows.

 

When you push the sim in, it should stop itself with 5mm of the sim card remaining outside of the Octopus, allowing you to remove it easily. There is no release mechanism, just push and remove.


 
What’s next?

1 – Connecting RS485 Modbus devices to the Wattics Octopus
2 – Connecting pulse outputs to the Wattics Octopus
3 - Connecting PT100 probes to the Wattics Octopus
4 – Configuring your Octopus Gateway with the Wattics Octopus Software Tool

 

Octopus Troubleshooting

If you have a question that is not asked and answered on these pages, please contact us at support@wattics.com

Does the GND lines of the Octopus server and IO extension units need to be connected if both units are used for pulse counts?

If the Octopus Gateway and the I/O Extension unit are on the same CANBus then they already share the GND, so you just need to connect it on one of the units.

Anthony Schoofs

Anthony Schoofs

Chief Technical Officer at Wattics
Anthony drives Wattics' innovation on energy efficiency for industrial and grid environments. Anthony is also behind WSNbuzz.com, a blog covering technology advances within the smart grid and IoT markets, and was listed in 2011 amongst the top 100 IoT thinkers. Anthony was recently awarded the Globe Sustainability Research Award for his contribution to advancing knowledge on sustainability.
Anthony Schoofs
Does the Octopus accept all types of sim cards (normal, mini, nano)?

The Octopus Gateway only accepts the Standard SIM Card type.

Anthony Schoofs

Anthony Schoofs

Chief Technical Officer at Wattics
Anthony drives Wattics' innovation on energy efficiency for industrial and grid environments. Anthony is also behind WSNbuzz.com, a blog covering technology advances within the smart grid and IoT markets, and was listed in 2011 amongst the top 100 IoT thinkers. Anthony was recently awarded the Globe Sustainability Research Award for his contribution to advancing knowledge on sustainability.
Anthony Schoofs
How many parameters can be stored in the Octopus?

The Octopus Gateway has a 150000 circular log and each parameter measurement corresponds to 1 log.

Anthony Schoofs

Anthony Schoofs

Chief Technical Officer at Wattics
Anthony drives Wattics' innovation on energy efficiency for industrial and grid environments. Anthony is also behind WSNbuzz.com, a blog covering technology advances within the smart grid and IoT markets, and was listed in 2011 amongst the top 100 IoT thinkers. Anthony was recently awarded the Globe Sustainability Research Award for his contribution to advancing knowledge on sustainability.
Anthony Schoofs
How to check if my Octopus Gateway successfully transmits data to Wattics

You can use the CDT.exe tool to verify the status of the Octopus’ data push to Wattics. The CDT.exe tool is located in the same directory as the WatticsTool.exe:

 
Launch the CDT.exe Software Tool, tick ‘Serial Number’, enter your Octopus serial number (e.g. 230001AB) and click Connect.
 


 
Once connected, click on the System Messages tab, and checks the logs:

  • LAN connection: if you see a message starting with [ETH] showing up every 30 seconds, then it means that the connection to the Wattics platform fails and the Octopus tries to reconnect. If no message pops up within a minute then the connection is established.
  •  

  • GPRS connection: if you see messages with ATModem::Connect (ConnectionID: 0) and DISCONNECT: 0 | RX: 0 | TX 0 | LN: 227 showing up alternatively every 30 seconds, then it means that the connection fails due to the PIN code of the sim being active or to the use of wrong APN credentials. Logs showing new connections may also appear should the network signal strength be low. A successful connection will only show updates on network signal strength with no disconnection or reset logs.

 

Troubleshooting

1. If using a LAN connection, make sure that the IT team has configured their firewall to allow TCP communication from the Octopus to octopus.wattics.com (52.50.202.103) on port 4401. You can also double check that you have correctly set up the Wattics URL where data collected will be sent to. Navigate to Output>Services from the top menu, and do the following:

  • Enable Service 1
  • Set Wattics as Service Name
  • Enter octopus.wattics.com as Service Host Address (IMPORTANT: When using GPRS Sim cards or when your firewall does not support the use of URLs, you must enter 52.50.202.103 as Service Host Address.)
  • Set 4401 as Port
  • Click OK.

 

 
2. When using GPRS Sim cards or when your firewall does not support the use of URLs, you must enter 52.50.202.103 as Service Host Address in your Octopus project file. To check this, run the Wattics Tool and open your project, then go to Output>Services. Change octopus.wattics.com with 52.50.202.103, save and redeploy your project. Double check your APN credentials, and disable your sim card’s 4-digit PIN code using any unlocked mobile phone.

 

​​3. To check if data is being received on Wattics’ end, you must go to the Breakdown tab in your Dashboard, click on your data point and check the control panel on the right hand side. If Jan 1970 is shown then it means that no data has been received yet (please wait for at least 10-15mn). The panel will otherwise update to today’s date when data starts being collected, and you will be able to select that day and check the first data points coming in.


 

You can also check the last data packet received in the meter status available in the Attributes tab, that you can access by hovering over your name in the top right corner. Invalid Date means that no data has been received yet.

 

Please contact us at support@wattics.com if you have any question regarding this verification process.

Anthony Schoofs

Anthony Schoofs

Chief Technical Officer at Wattics
Anthony drives Wattics' innovation on energy efficiency for industrial and grid environments. Anthony is also behind WSNbuzz.com, a blog covering technology advances within the smart grid and IoT markets, and was listed in 2011 amongst the top 100 IoT thinkers. Anthony was recently awarded the Globe Sustainability Research Award for his contribution to advancing knowledge on sustainability.
Anthony Schoofs
How to insert my sim card into the Octopus GPRS Gateway

First of all, you must ensure that you use a standard sim card, with the 4-digit PIN code disabled (that can be done with any unlocked mobile phone). Other sim card types are not supported.


 

The sim card must be inserted as follows.

 

When you push the sim in, it should stop itself with 5mm of the sim card remaining outside of the Octopus, allowing you to remove it easily. There is no release mechanism, just push and remove.

 

You may contact us at support@wattics.com for any clarification.
 

Anthony Schoofs

Anthony Schoofs

Chief Technical Officer at Wattics
Anthony drives Wattics' innovation on energy efficiency for industrial and grid environments. Anthony is also behind WSNbuzz.com, a blog covering technology advances within the smart grid and IoT markets, and was listed in 2011 amongst the top 100 IoT thinkers. Anthony was recently awarded the Globe Sustainability Research Award for his contribution to advancing knowledge on sustainability.
Anthony Schoofs
How to wire different types of pulses?

The Octopus and I/O Extension units can accept 4 types of pulses, please refer to the correct wiring diagram depending on your metering setup.

 

Dry Contact Pulses

 


 

Dry Contacts (with no power source):

1. Power the Octopus off
2. Connect the Octopus V+ line to the meter’s input line
3. Connect the meter’s pulse output line to the Octopus digital input line
3. Power up the Octopus

Dry Contacts (already with power supply on common):
The first check is to ensure that the 3rd party controller’s power supply is DC and does not exceed the maximum voltage of 24VDC. Once this is confirmed, follow the steps below:

1. Power Octopus and controller off
2. Connect the GND from Octopus Power Supply to the GND of the 3rd party controller’s power supply
3. Connect pulse output(s) from the 3rd party’s controller to Octopus digital inputs
4. Power up both units

The problem with not having a common GND is that the voltage at the 3rd party controller’s input can be higher than 24VDC.

 

Diode Pulses

Same connection as the dry contact pulses but with polarity. That means the 24VDC and the pulse unit need to be connected to the right terminal input/output of the pulse meter.

 

Transistor (PNP/NPN) Pulses

 


 

Pulses types need to be verified before the installation to avoid any problems.

Anthony Schoofs

Anthony Schoofs

Chief Technical Officer at Wattics
Anthony drives Wattics' innovation on energy efficiency for industrial and grid environments. Anthony is also behind WSNbuzz.com, a blog covering technology advances within the smart grid and IoT markets, and was listed in 2011 amongst the top 100 IoT thinkers. Anthony was recently awarded the Globe Sustainability Research Award for his contribution to advancing knowledge on sustainability.
Anthony Schoofs
Pulses are not counted by the Octopus, what should I do?

Should pulses not be counted by the Octopus devices, you can follow the following steps to troubleshoot the issue:

1 – Use a multimeter to verify that:

  • Pulses are generated by the pulse-emitting device and visible at the multimeter. No pulses means an issue with the pulse-emitting device and not with the Octopus.
  • The output voltage line of the pulse-emitting device goes back to near 0V between pulses. Any base voltage over 1V can possibly mean that the 0-24V transitions are not captured by the Octopus, requiring remote assistance to update the pulse threshold on the Octopus.

2 – Short the V+ terminal outputs of the Octopus devices with any of its terminal inputs to simulate pulses and check if these are counted by the Octopus. If they are not counted then it means that there is a misconfiguration with your Octopus software project, please check you have used the correct driver and the correct input number.

Anthony Schoofs

Anthony Schoofs

Chief Technical Officer at Wattics
Anthony drives Wattics' innovation on energy efficiency for industrial and grid environments. Anthony is also behind WSNbuzz.com, a blog covering technology advances within the smart grid and IoT markets, and was listed in 2011 amongst the top 100 IoT thinkers. Anthony was recently awarded the Globe Sustainability Research Award for his contribution to advancing knowledge on sustainability.
Anthony Schoofs
Anthony Schoofs

Anthony Schoofs

Chief Technical Officer at Wattics
Anthony drives Wattics' innovation on energy efficiency for industrial and grid environments. Anthony is also behind WSNbuzz.com, a blog covering technology advances within the smart grid and IoT markets, and was listed in 2011 amongst the top 100 IoT thinkers. Anthony was recently awarded the Globe Sustainability Research Award for his contribution to advancing knowledge on sustainability.
Anthony Schoofs

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